Centris pallida are located in dry, hot environments of North America. Specifically, they are in Arizona, Nevada, southern California, New Mexico, and western Mexico.[4] They are a very common bee (especially in Arizona), and are thus classified as Least Concern in terms of conservation.[5] The fur and dark colored exoskeleton allow the bees to survive the cold nights in the desert. During the daytime, C. pallida are almost completely inactive, hiding in shade or in burrows to prevent overheating.[6]
The genus Centris contains circa 250 species of large apid bees occurring in the Neotropical and Nearctic regions, from Kansas to Argentina. Most females of these bees possess adaptations for carrying floral oils rather than (or in addition to) pollen or nectar. They visit mainly plants of the family Malpighiaceae to collect oil, but also Plantaginaceae, Calceolariaceae, Krameriaceae and others. Recent studies have shown they are sister to the corbiculate bees, the most well-known and economically important group of bees [1]
Le patrimoine architectural de Québec comprend l'ensemble des bâtiments de l'Assemblée nationale qui ont été érigés sur la colline Parlementaire à partir de 1877. On y retrouve deux styles architecturaux, soit le style Second Empire pour l'Hôtel du Parlement et l'architecture Beaux-Arts pour les autres édifices. La Citadelle de Québec, construite entre 1820 et 1831, le Château Frontenac, bâti entre 1892 et 1893, et la Terrasse Dufferin font également partie du site patrimonial du Vieux-Québec.
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