I listed end of november..wks before Christmas...lots of interest on line, but not that many phone c...alls...tons from Real estate agents...promising all kinds of stuff...& unfortunately my open houses, were either in a snow storm or extremely cold..had more action in february & march...I had over 9,000 visits to my site...the single family house is in a very good location...TIP: if you give an email address... i suggest using the # & street of the house in gmail. easy to remember for future buyers. Offer accepted in march... See More
Desert birds and lizards are predators of C. pallida, and these bees can be parasitized by the meloid beetle (Tegrodera erosa); however, rain is the largest threat to these bees.[12] At night and during the heat of the day, C. pallida bees will hide under rocks, trees, in burrows, etc. When it rains, the bees can get wet. If the bee is in a burrow, it may simply drown. If the bee is underneath something, when night comes, the bee may freeze to death due to the low temperatures in the desert. Since these bees are solitary, they don’t have the protection of a hive or colony; thus, they are more susceptible to the elements.[11]
"Homes are selling faster and faster in the Montréal area, as the average selling time, for all property categories combined, was 80 days in November, which is seven days less than one year ago," said Nathalie Bégin, President of the GMREB board of directors. "Single-family homes and plexes sold the fastest – in an average of 72 days – while it took an average of 94 days for a condominium to sell," she added. 
Centris pallida are able to withstand very high internal temperatures when compared to other bees. Males regularly have thoracic temperatures of 48 to 49 degrees Celsius (118.4 to 120.2 degrees Fahrenheit). If the thoracic temperature reaches 51 to 52 degrees Celsius (123.8 to 125.6 degrees Fahrenheit), the bee will become paralyzed and die. Most of the cooling occurs when heat radiates off the abdomen. To prevent overheating, C. pallida have a very high thoracic conductance (rate of heat transfer from the thorax to the abdomen) which is 45 percent higher than that of sphinx moths of the same size. Other than this high thoracic conductance, no other mechanism has been found to help the bee reduce its internal temperature. C. pallida do not appear to have evaporative cooling in the wild as honey bees and bumblebees do.[10]

Centris pallida is a species of solitary bee native to North America. It lacks an accepted common name; however, it has been called the digger bee, the desert bee, and the pallid bee due to its actions, habitat, and color respectively. The solitary nature of this bee allows for a dual-strategy mating system which produces an evolutionarily stable state resistant to invading strategies. These bees have also evolved to withstand the high temperatures of their native habitat. C. pallida routinely has internal temperatures within 3 degrees Celsius of death.

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