Le réseau immobilier no 1 dans le monde4 s'est forgé une réputation enviable grâce à l'expertise et à l'efficacité indéniables de ses courtiers. Pour favoriser le développement de ces qualités essentielles, RE/MAX a mis sur pied le Collège d'enseignement en immobilier (C.E.I.) au Québec tandis que RE/MAX International a fondé l'université RE/MAX à Denver, au Colorado. Dans ces institutions, les courtiers reçoivent une formation enrichie qui leur permet de vous assister pendant l'acquisition de votre semi détaché à Victoriaville.

RE/MAX a acquis une brillante renommée au Québec et ailleurs dans le monde4 en tant que plus grand réseau immobilier grâce à ses courtiers hautement qualifiés et aux outils spécialisés mis à leur disposition. Auprès d'un courtier RE/MAX, vous avez la certitude d'obtenir toute l'assistance nécessaire pour conclure l'achat de votre maison à Montréal.
The 18,000 square metres (190,000 sq ft), 12-floor Eton Cyberpod Centris office building targets business process outsourcing companies.[1] Each floor has 2,000 square metres (22,000 sq ft).[8] The building is listed as an approved IT Center by the Philippine Economic Zone Authority, making export-oriented companies located therein eligible for temporary tax holiday, permanent reduced rate of corporate income tax, and other incentives.[9]
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The two categories of behavior for C. pallida males are patrolling and hovering. These strategies are also used to find mates. In one category (the patrollers), male bees will patrol 3–6 centimeters above the ground in search of sites where buried virgin females will emerge. When a male bee finds such a site, he will dig 1–2 centimeters through the soil by gnawing at the surface with his jaws and using his forelegs to remove dirt from the excavation. If a female is found, he will attempt to mate with her either on the surface or at a nearby flower or tree. Other patrollers will sometimes attempt to steal a digging spot that another bee has found. If a bee has already found a female, another patroller bee may separate the male from the female so that it can copulate with the virgin. More often than not, the female (once found) will mate with either the male that found her or with an intruder.[6]
There is a size correlation which determines whether males become patrollers or hoverers. Patrollers tend to be larger so that they can better protect and copulate with emerging females. Smaller males are usually unable to compete as well, and so have to make the best out of a bad situation; thus, they become hoverers. Each group has a different set of behaviors. The patrollers move over a large space containing many other patrollers. Usually, patrollers will frequent the same spots over the course of their lives. Since the area is so large, the cost to defend it against other patrollers would be much greater than the potential mating benefits, so the patrollers show very little territoriality.[11] Patroller males will usually only fight when a breeding female is near. In contrast, each hoverer stakes out an area of about one meter in diameter. These areas don’t overlap with other hoverers. Any fast moving object (i.e. bee, dragonfly, leaf, etc.) that enters a territory will be quickly chased. The chase allows the male bee to determine if a female is unmated, or if an enemy male is in his territory. If it is a male bee, the territory owner will chase it out, but not beyond the boundary of the territory. What is interesting is that every day (or even every several hours) the territory holder will abandon the area to establish a new zone. Often the male will never return to the vacated area, and it will be taken over by another male. This shows that hoverers show a low site tendency but strong territoriality.[11] A balanced ratio of patrollers to hoverers is maintained, and thus, this ratio is an evolutionary stable strategy. If more males become patrollers, then the hoverers will benefit from the reduced competition, and the hoverers' genes will spread until the stable ratio is returned to. The same thing will happen if more males become hoverers.
This bee is black and densely covered in a grey pubescence or fur on the dorsal side. The thorax fur has a slightly yellow color. The legs have a mixture of black and reddish fur. The ventral side of the bee is covered in a brownish or dark yellow fur. The wings are fairly transparent except for the black veins that run through them. Males and females are similar in size at about 16–17 millimeters. Males have eyes more yellow in color, and their thorax fur is lighter. Females have eyes more green in color, and their thorax fur is more brown than grey.[3]

The Centris 610 and 650 were replaced about six months after their introduction by the Quadra 610 and 650 models, which kept the same case and designs but raised the CPU speeds from 20 MHz and 25 MHz to 25 MHz and 33 MHz respectively; while the Centris 660AV was renamed to Quadra 660AV without any actual design change. These Macs also existed during Apple's transition from auto-inject floppy drives to manual-inject drives.[4] This is why there are two different styles of floppy drive bezel (faceplate) on these models. Some later Centris 660AV Macs have manual-inject floppy drives, so this change was not exactly concurrent with the name change.
Après des études collégiales en arts, Brigitte Poitras a étudié en marketing à l'université d'Ottawa. Coanimatrice à l'émission Bye-bye Maison!, elle oeuvre dans le domaine de la décoration depuis 1997 à titre de décoratrice-styliste. C'est en 2003 qu'elle s'est intéressée au phénomène immobilier américain : le home staging. Ce concept a piqué sa curiosité...
I listed end of november..wks before Christmas...lots of interest on line, but not that many phone c...alls...tons from Real estate agents...promising all kinds of stuff...& unfortunately my open houses, were either in a snow storm or extremely cold..had more action in february & march...I had over 9,000 visits to my site...the single family house is in a very good location...TIP: if you give an email address... i suggest using the # & street of the house in gmail. easy to remember for future buyers. Offer accepted in march... See More

Male C. pallida are able detect the pheromones which females release and use them to locate female burrows. When a virgin female is about to emerge from her burrow, she releases a scent that wafts up through the soil and is detected by the antenna of the males. This has led to males developing a very acute olfactory sense. Freshly-killed females have been buried to test whether sound also plays a part in male signaling. In these tests, male bees still dug up the dead females, proving that pheromone signaling is the only pathway. Males have also been observed to dig up other males. This shows that males and virgin females give off similar pheromones. Oddly, males also sometimes dig up other digger bee species. It is currently unknown why this occurs.[6]

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