«Alors que nous continuons de simplifier et de recentrer nos activités, nous croyons que la cession de CFDP [ComFree/DuProprio] est une autre étape très positive pour les Pages Jaunes et nos parties prenantes», a expliqué le président et chef de la direction, David A. Eckert, lundi, en commentant la transaction qui devrait être complétée le ou vers le 6 juillet.
The two categories of behavior for C. pallida males are patrolling and hovering. These strategies are also used to find mates. In one category (the patrollers), male bees will patrol 3–6 centimeters above the ground in search of sites where buried virgin females will emerge. When a male bee finds such a site, he will dig 1–2 centimeters through the soil by gnawing at the surface with his jaws and using his forelegs to remove dirt from the excavation. If a female is found, he will attempt to mate with her either on the surface or at a nearby flower or tree. Other patrollers will sometimes attempt to steal a digging spot that another bee has found. If a bee has already found a female, another patroller bee may separate the male from the female so that it can copulate with the virgin. More often than not, the female (once found) will mate with either the male that found her or with an intruder.[6]
L'unité de comparaison des prix de l'immobilier est généralement le prix au mètre carré (ou au pied carré, dans certains pays anglo-saxons). Pour les propriétés à revenus, on se sert de multiples du revenu et d'autres mesures reliées (taux d'actualisation). Enfin, des unités de comparaison fort variables sont aussi utilisées suivant le type de propriété (mètre cube, mètre de façade, prix à la chambre ou à l'appartement, etc.).
Centris pallida is a species of solitary bee native to North America. It lacks an accepted common name; however, it has been called the digger bee, the desert bee, and the pallid bee due to its actions, habitat, and color respectively. The solitary nature of this bee allows for a dual-strategy mating system which produces an evolutionarily stable state resistant to invading strategies. These bees have also evolved to withstand the high temperatures of their native habitat. C. pallida routinely has internal temperatures within 3 degrees Celsius of death.
Male C. pallida are able detect the pheromones which females release and use them to locate female burrows. When a virgin female is about to emerge from her burrow, she releases a scent that wafts up through the soil and is detected by the antenna of the males. This has led to males developing a very acute olfactory sense. Freshly-killed females have been buried to test whether sound also plays a part in male signaling. In these tests, male bees still dug up the dead females, proving that pheromone signaling is the only pathway. Males have also been observed to dig up other males. This shows that males and virgin females give off similar pheromones. Oddly, males also sometimes dig up other digger bee species. It is currently unknown why this occurs.[6]
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