I listed end of november..wks before Christmas...lots of interest on line, but not that many phone calls...tons from Real estate agents...promising all kinds of stuff...& unfortunately my open houses, were either in a snow storm or extremely cold..had more action in february & march...I had over 9,000 visits to my site...the single family house is in a very good location...TIP: if you give an email address... i suggest using the # & street of the house in gmail. easy to remember for future buyers. Offer accepted in march...
Maison de ville (23' x 32') avec sous-sol aménagé, très bien entretenue. Les pièces sont vastes et les quatre chambres possèdent de grands rangements. Au rez-de-chaussée, la cuisine comprend un îlot déplaçable. Cet étage possède également une salle à manger, un grand salon et une salle d'eau. Au sous-sol, on retrouve une grande salle familiale, la quatrième chambre, deux rangements supplémentaires, un atelier ainsi que l'aspirateur central et l'échangeur d'air. Possibilité de convertir l'atelier en salle de bain.
Advenant le cas où l’acheteur, ses ayants droits, ses successeurs ou tout autre acheteur ou cessionnaire postérieur serait en défaut de respecter l’un ou l’autre des règlements stipulés au présent acte, tout propriétaire d’une résidence du projet Square Watson, immédiatement adjacente de la propriété aura un intérêt suffisant pour prendre toute poursuite et/ou toute procédure visant à forcer l’acheteur, ses ayants-droits, ses successeurs ou tout autre acheteur ou cessionnaire postérieur à respecter lesdits règlements moyennant une mise en demeure de dix (10) jours.
Le courtier est soumis à la Loi sur le courtage immobilier et se conforme à diverses mesures pour assurer votre protection : il remplit les exigences de l’Organisme d’autoréglementation du courtage immobilier du Québec, contribue au Fonds d’indemnisation du courtage immobilier et souscrit une assurance responsabilité professionnelle. Il porte la responsabilité de la transaction immobilière.
There is a size correlation which determines whether males become patrollers or hoverers. Patrollers tend to be larger so that they can better protect and copulate with emerging females. Smaller males are usually unable to compete as well, and so have to make the best out of a bad situation; thus, they become hoverers. Each group has a different set of behaviors. The patrollers move over a large space containing many other patrollers. Usually, patrollers will frequent the same spots over the course of their lives. Since the area is so large, the cost to defend it against other patrollers would be much greater than the potential mating benefits, so the patrollers show very little territoriality.[11] Patroller males will usually only fight when a breeding female is near. In contrast, each hoverer stakes out an area of about one meter in diameter. These areas don’t overlap with other hoverers. Any fast moving object (i.e. bee, dragonfly, leaf, etc.) that enters a territory will be quickly chased. The chase allows the male bee to determine if a female is unmated, or if an enemy male is in his territory. If it is a male bee, the territory owner will chase it out, but not beyond the boundary of the territory. What is interesting is that every day (or even every several hours) the territory holder will abandon the area to establish a new zone. Often the male will never return to the vacated area, and it will be taken over by another male. This shows that hoverers show a low site tendency but strong territoriality.[11] A balanced ratio of patrollers to hoverers is maintained, and thus, this ratio is an evolutionary stable strategy. If more males become patrollers, then the hoverers will benefit from the reduced competition, and the hoverers' genes will spread until the stable ratio is returned to. The same thing will happen if more males become hoverers.
Male C. pallida are able detect the pheromones which females release and use them to locate female burrows. When a virgin female is about to emerge from her burrow, she releases a scent that wafts up through the soil and is detected by the antenna of the males. This has led to males developing a very acute olfactory sense. Freshly-killed females have been buried to test whether sound also plays a part in male signaling. In these tests, male bees still dug up the dead females, proving that pheromone signaling is the only pathway. Males have also been observed to dig up other males. This shows that males and virgin females give off similar pheromones. Oddly, males also sometimes dig up other digger bee species. It is currently unknown why this occurs.[6]
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