Apple released three computers bearing the Centris name: the Centris 610 (replacing the Macintosh IIsi) and Centris 650 (replacing the Macintosh IIci in form and the Quadra 700 in function), both of which were introduced in March 1993,[1] and the Centris 660AV which followed in July. Apple also considered the Macintosh IIvx to be part of the Centris line. The IIvx was released in October of the previous year, but, according to Apple, their lawyers were unable to complete the trademark check on the "Centris" name in time for the IIvx's release.[1]
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Pages Jaunes, qui a vécu de beaux jours avec ses bottins téléphoniques, s’est recyclée de peine et de misère au fil des ans dans le numérique avec, notamment, le site Canada411.ca et DuProprio.com. Plus récemment, la compagnie a décidé de réduire ses dépenses et de recentrer ses activités afin d’améliorer sa santé financière. Dans cet esprit, Pages Jaunes a renvoyé son président et chef de la direction l'an dernier et a mis en branle, au début de l'année, un effort de consolidation qui s’est notamment soldé par la mise à pied de quelque 500 employés, soit 18 % de son personnel.


Male C. pallida are able detect the pheromones which females release and use them to locate female burrows. When a virgin female is about to emerge from her burrow, she releases a scent that wafts up through the soil and is detected by the antenna of the males. This has led to males developing a very acute olfactory sense. Freshly-killed females have been buried to test whether sound also plays a part in male signaling. In these tests, male bees still dug up the dead females, proving that pheromone signaling is the only pathway. Males have also been observed to dig up other males. This shows that males and virgin females give off similar pheromones. Oddly, males also sometimes dig up other digger bee species. It is currently unknown why this occurs.[6]
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