Les informations des propriétés sur ce site proviennent des inscriptions Royal LePage et du service de distribution de données de l'Association canadienne de l’immeuble (SDD). SDD mets en référence des inscriptions tenues par des agences immobilières autres que Royal LePage et ses distributeurs. L'exactitude de l'information n'est pas garantie et devrait être indépendamment vérifiée.
Centris pallida are able to withstand very high internal temperatures when compared to other bees. Males regularly have thoracic temperatures of 48 to 49 degrees Celsius (118.4 to 120.2 degrees Fahrenheit). If the thoracic temperature reaches 51 to 52 degrees Celsius (123.8 to 125.6 degrees Fahrenheit), the bee will become paralyzed and die. Most of the cooling occurs when heat radiates off the abdomen. To prevent overheating, C. pallida have a very high thoracic conductance (rate of heat transfer from the thorax to the abdomen) which is 45 percent higher than that of sphinx moths of the same size. Other than this high thoracic conductance, no other mechanism has been found to help the bee reduce its internal temperature. C. pallida do not appear to have evaporative cooling in the wild as honey bees and bumblebees do.[10]
Centris pallida typically feed on flowers that can withstand the hot temperatures of its habitat. These plants include palo verde (Cercidium microphyllum and Cercidium floridium), ironwood (Olnyea tesota), and creosote bush (Larrea divaricata).[9] The palo verde pollen is the most common, and it gives the bee bread a strong orange color.[7] Due to the large expenditure of energy by males during hovering and/or patrolling, they must consume about 3.5 times their body weight in nectar each day.[10]
"Homes are selling faster and faster in the Montréal area, as the average selling time, for all property categories combined, was 80 days in November, which is seven days less than one year ago," said Nathalie Bégin, President of the GMREB board of directors. "Single-family homes and plexes sold the fastest – in an average of 72 days – while it took an average of 94 days for a condominium to sell," she added. 
La Fédération Qui sommes-nous? Nos membres Nos services Notre équipe Mot du président Conseil d’administration Comités permanents Pourquoi un courtier ? Pour être mieux protégé Pour bénéficier de services professionnels Pour vendre ou acheter au juste prix Pour profiter de ressources exclusives lors d’un achat Conseils pour les acheteurs Conseils pour les vendeurs Marché immobilier Statistiques du marché immobilier Baromètres FCIQ Carrefour Statistiques Au sujet des statistiques Demande de statistiques Analyse Mot de l’économiste Bulletin d’information
REALTOR®, REALTORS® et le logo REALTOR® sont des marques déposées de REALTOR® Canada Inc., une compagnie dont la National Association of REALTORS® et l'Association canadienne de l'immeuble sont propriétaires. Les marques de commerce REALTOR® servent à distinguer les services immobiliers offerts par les courtiers et agents d'immeuble en tant que membres de l'ACI. Les marques d'homologation S.I.A.® /MLS®, Service inter-agences®, et leurs logos respectifs sont la propriété de l'ACI, et ils servent à identifier les services immobiliers que fournissent les courtiers et agents d'immeuble membres de l'ACI. 

Fenêtre sur le marché Études spéciales Grands dossiers Révision de la Loi sur le courtage immobilier Taxe de bienvenue Régime d’accession à la propriété (RAP) Encadrement législatif des copropriétés Dossiers juridiques Publications Mémoires Baromètres FCIQ Mot de l’économiste Bulletin d’information Fenêtre sur le marché Carrefour Statistiques Salle de Presse Communiqués de presse Nouvelles FCIQ Zone vidéo Demandes médias Archives

Male C. pallida are able detect the pheromones which females release and use them to locate female burrows. When a virgin female is about to emerge from her burrow, she releases a scent that wafts up through the soil and is detected by the antenna of the males. This has led to males developing a very acute olfactory sense. Freshly-killed females have been buried to test whether sound also plays a part in male signaling. In these tests, male bees still dug up the dead females, proving that pheromone signaling is the only pathway. Males have also been observed to dig up other males. This shows that males and virgin females give off similar pheromones. Oddly, males also sometimes dig up other digger bee species. It is currently unknown why this occurs.[6]

×